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What do fanzines include?

What do fanzines include?

A fanzine (blend of fan and magazine or -zine) is a non-professional and non-official publication produced by enthusiasts of a particular cultural phenomenon (such as a literary or musical genre) for the pleasure of others who share their interest.

Are fanzines legal?

There is actually a provision of copyright law that makes K/S zines legal so long as they are non-profit. It’s called “fair use.” Fair use was intended for such things as teachers xeroxing articles for the classroom, but it applies to any non-profit use of copyrighted material. Fair use doesn’t exist for our benefit.

What is the meaning of fanzines?

noun. a magazine or other periodical produced inexpensively by and for fans of science fiction and fantasy writing, comic books, popular music, or other specialized popular interests.

How many pages are fanzines?

Page count varies from as few as 8 pages and up. The traditional binding process for zine printing is saddle stitching, which can accommodate a publication of up to 92 pages. Anything larger will need to be perfect bound.

Are zines dead?

Zines are still alive.

What were the first zines?

The first zine is often traced back to a 1930s effort by the Science Correspondence Club in Chicago. It was called The Comet, and it started a long-lasting trend of sci-fi related zines. The important sci-fi zine Fantasy Commentator began in 1943, and ran in various iterations (though not continuously) until 2004.

Are zines still a thing?

In the 1960s, zines were widely used in political subculture movements, and they became increasingly popular in the 70s and 80s due to both the rise of the punk scene and copy machines. In the 90s, zines played a key role in the Riot grrl punk feminist movements. But now zines are back — and they’re better than ever.

How much does it cost to make a zine?

How Much Does it Cost to Get a Zine Printed?

Size/Qty 100 1000
8.5 x 11 $3.97 each $397.36 total $2.15 each $2,152.86 total
5.5 x 8.5 $2.69 each $268.72 total $1.28 each $1,280.84 total
6 x 9 $3.04 each $303.63 total $1.30 each $1,296.63 total

What was fanzine original name?

The word fanzine comes from a blend of two words, ‘Fan’ and ‘Magazine’ or ‘Zine’ for short.

What is the two original word of Medicare?

Medicare (n.) name for a state-run health insurance system for the elderly, 1962, originally in a Canadian context, from medical (adj.) + care (n.). U.S. use is from 1965; the U.S. program was set up by Title XVIII of the Social Security Act of 1965.

What is the difference between a zine and a magazine?

While magazines are typically produced by a publishing company or group, zines are often self-published or published by a small collective. Rather than putting a large focus on profit, the goal of zines is often expression and creation. They are curated to reflect the creative eye or opinion of the editor.

Who started zines?

What was the purpose of the fanzines and zines?

Using non-traditional communication networks and the US Postal Service, fanzine and zine publishers established a framework for intimate, meaningful, open discourse outside and in opposition (sometimes unconsciously, sometimes not) to corporate control.”

Who was the first person to use the term fanzine?

The term “fanzine” was coined by Russ Chauvenet in the October 1940 edition of his fanzine Detours. “Fanzines” were distinguished from “prozines,” (a term Chauvenet also invented): that is, all professional magazines. Prior to that, the fan publications were known as “fanmags” or “letterzines”.

Are there other media fanzines in the Internet Archive?

For other media fanzines uploaded to the Internet Archive that are not part of our collection see: https://archive.org/details/fav-fanzine_collection_archivist Spockanalia is a gen Star Trek: TOS anthology of stories, poems, articles, art and letters.

When did Russ Chauvenet invent the term fanzine?

The term “fanzine” was coined by Russ Chauvenet in the October 1940 edition of his fanzine Detours. “Fanzines” were distinguished from “prozines,” (a term Chauvenet also invented): that is, all professional magazines.